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Trimarni is place where athletes and fitness enthusiasts receive motivation, inspiration, education, counseling and coaching in the areas of nutrition, fitness, health, sport nutrition, training and life.

We emphasize a real food diet and our coaching philosophy is simple: Train hard, recover harder. No junk miles but instead, respect for your amazing body. Every time you move your body you do so with a purpose. Our services are designed with your goals in mind so that you can live an active and healthy, balanced lifestyle.

Trimarni Blog

A blog dedicated to exercise, nutrition and my life

Filtering by Category: "iron girl"

Reflect, Rejuvenate, Refuel - it's the off-season!

Marni Sumbal


I'm currently finalizing the last parts of the newest pre-built plan at Trimarni Coaching and Nutrition. The Trimarni 5-week off season transition phase training plan includes 5 weeks of strength training, hip/core work, specific workouts for swim, bike and run to improve form and efficiency as well as 5 weeks of nutrition tips!! This plan has taken a while to put together but I am so excited to offer it to athletes and fitness enthusiasts in the next few weeks to help everyone improve the chance of having a great consistent 2014 season.

In the mean time...enjoy my latest article from my monthly column at Irongirl.com



Reflect, Rejuvenate, Refuel in the Off-Season
By Marni Sumbal, MS, RD, LD/N
Trimarni Coaching and Nutrition, LLC


Hard works feels amazing when it pays off. Although training for an event can be hard on the body,  the positive energy that you receive at a finish line is worth all the sacrifices.  

It's important that your off-season compliments your racing season. The key to the off-season is to enjoy a well-needed break from structured activity but to not lose the fitness that you gained throughout last year.

Here are a few tips on how you can feel great about your 4-6 week, planned off-season:

Reflect
How'd you feel about last season? Did you try a new event or distance or are you still chasing a PR or podium spot? Address any limiters that can be worked on with strength training, flexibility or with a change in your weekly routine. As you plan for next season's races, consider weather, terrain, time of the year and distance to highlight your strengths.

Rejuvenate
Save your energy for when it counts. You do not need to be "in the best shape possible" 365 days a year. To get faster and stronger, the body needs training stress so the off-season is the perfect time to exercise just for health benefits. Consider trying something new to meet other fitness enthusiasts or, take an active trip. Although strength training, hip and core work is recommend year round, the off-season is the perfect time to reduce risk for injury and improve power with strength training, functional exercises and/or plyometrics.

Refuel  The celebratory post-race foods should only last a few days until your body will request a more balanced, nutrient dense diet. Whereas many athletes fear the off-season for unintentional weight gain due to reduced training volume, I recommend looking forward to the off-season as a time to develop a healthy relationship with food, to discover your culinary creativity and to get to know your body and true hunger signals when you aren't excessively burning calories. Learn to create a more real food diet which is filled with lots of seasonal fruits and veggies and complimented with whole grains and fiber-rich starches, quality protein and heart healthy fats. If you struggled with energy/fatigue, body composition and/or your relationship with food and the body during the past year, consider using this time to work with a dietitian that specializes in sport nutrition.  
  


 Irongirl.com

Travel to race: Nutrition tips

Marni Sumbal

So there was a lot going on this past week, hence the lack of blogging. BUT life is continuing to move forward and no day is being wasted. I have lots to catch up on via the blog but for the mean time, how about an old Iron Girl article of mine regarding nutrition when traveling for a race. Enjoy!!


In route to Kona, (Honolulu airport) for the 2011 Ironman World Championship.

TRAVEL TO RACE: Nutrition Tips

Pertaining to nutrition, the overall mission of an Iron Girl athlete is to develop a healthy relationship with food. Although body composition goals are often primary reasons for embarking in the Iron Girl lifestyle, longevity, performance gains and a commitment to keeping your body healthy are top priorities when creating lifelong, practical dietary habits. For the nutrients that you put into your body will help fuel your fitness routine as well as reducing the risk for disease or illness.

If you prioritize heart-healthy choices on an everyday basis, you should welcome traveling (or when celebrating a special event) as an opportunity to try new foods and to enjoy a temporary change in routine. While it is advisable to maintain a few healthy habits to control blood sugar levels, maintain energy and limit overindulging, it is important to be "ok" with not abiding to your every-day eating routine. By feeling confident with the foods that you put in your body on a daily basis, you should find yourself at ease when eating on the road.

Regardless if you are traveling for an athletic event, for fun or work, a little creativity will help you apply your personal healthy eating habits while on the road. If you haven't quite figured out how to balance everyday eating with eating on the road, here are a few helpful tips to get you started before creating your own routine for traveling nutrition:

1) Plan ahead to have an idea where and when you will eat. Google the surrounding area to have an idea of your dinning/grocery/food options. Do not go into a meal starving.
2) Bring along single-serving and/or portioned-controlled snacks such as fruit, veggies, yogurt, canned fruit/applesauce, trail mix, cereal, string cheese, nuts, homemade granola bars, sandwiches and water (if traveling for an event, don’t forget to bring water for race day!)
3) Pack your own meals for the road. Make your own wrap, bagel or deli sandwich (purchase a quality cooler and/or insulated lunchbox).
4) Be creative. Gas stations typically have microwaves, fill up on gas and cook your oatmeal, minute rice or heat your potato and choice of protein.. Also grocery stores have many pre-chopped/washed options for easy snacking or meal additions. If your hotel doesn't have a microwave/fridge, think outside of the box. Use your ice bucket to keep small items cool and invest in portable electric water kettle for coffee/oatmeal.  Don't forget plates/bowls and silverware.
5) Be frugal. If you are going to spend your money on a healthy meal, it’s suggested to pass on the $8 lettuce and tomato salad. Create a meal that will make you feel most satisfied. Consider a yogurt parfait, a PB&J or egg and veggie sandwich at a bagel shop or mix and match at a local grocery store.
6) Snack on fruits and veggies. It's really easy to have a colorless diet when you travel, not to mention lacking in variety. Ask the locals for the nearest grocery store and pick up a few servings of fruits and veggies for a colorful and fibrous snack.
7) Don't forget about protein. It’s really easy to indulge in carbs while on the road (especially if you choose to not eat meat, or a varied diet). Mom-and-pop restaurants (or diners) often cook-to-order. Cottage cheese, yogurt, tofu, skim milk, tofu, veggie burger and egg whites are great sources of protein to add to your meal.


Happy Traveling!

Recovering from your event tips

Marni Sumbal


 To cap off three quality days of training, Karel and I joined a group ride in the Clearwater/New Port Richey area (while visiting my family) to see our second family - the Gearlink Cycling team. Karel and I were set up on a group ride in 2006 on my birthday and we are so lucky to have them all in our life. What great people.....who also taught me how to enjoy riding my bicycle!


After a 4:15 ride (with around 60 minutes or so with the 80+ rider fast group ride), it was time to cool off in the pool with my favorite furry friend.

My latest article from Iron Girl has to do with a few tips on recovering from an event to ensure that your hard work during a race does not leave you sore, depressed or injured after the race. Enjoy!

Recovering From Your EventBy Marni Sumbal, MS, RD, LD/N
Trimarni Coaching and Nutrition, LLC


No matter how hard you push, there is stress on the body (emotional, physical and mental) during racing. Since it takes a long time for the body to prepare for an event, keep in mind that it also takes a time for it to recover.

Many athletes rush back into training too quickly and experience injuries, sickness or burnout a few weeks to months down the road. Recovery depends on many factors and not always can you "feel" yourself being 100% recovered. Here are a few tips to kick start the recovery process.
  1. Relax - Take your time post-race and move around, celebrate, cool off, rehydrate and refuel.
  2. Exercise – You can't train a damaged body or one that is low in fuel. Exercising is fine but give yourself at least 3-7 days before you do anything structured. Stick to non-weight bearing, gadget free activities.
  3.  Recovery tools - Compression, ice, epson salt, elevation are great to boost recovery.
  4. Sleep - Even if you experience post-race insomnia, try get a little extra sleep with an earlier bedtime for a few nights or with short naps when possible.
  5. Refuel - Replenish glycogen, hydrate and help with tissue/muscle damage by focusing on a mix of low residue carbs w/ a little quality protein and water with electrolytes (ex. fruits). Eat/hydrate every few hours for the next two days, as tolerated and monitor the color of your urine for hydration purposes.
  6. Natural anti-inflammatories- Pass on the bottled anti-inflammatories and choose ginger, pineapple, celery, fish and cherries to help with inflammation.
  7.  Protect your immune system - You are highly susceptible to illness and infections post-race. Be sure to keep your immune system healthy by keeping chaffing areas clean and being aware of any blisters or lost toenails.
  8.  Goal setting - Set a goal so you are motivated to train again but wait at least 4-6 weeks before racing again. The body and the mind need recovery and with new goals, a bit more training. You have plenty of time to race again, be patient and respectful to the body.
  9. When in doubt - give yourself 2 more days after you feel 100% recovered before you return to structured training. It's always better to take it easy for a few extra days and give yourself a little more time to soak-up your recent accomplishment and to thank your body.


Read more: HERE

Swim set, podcast link and tri-colored quinoa w/ tempeh

Marni Sumbal

As I have mentioned several times, I just love the Ironman journey. This time around, sharing it with Karel has been extra special for we have both been able to see progress within each other and that is really neat to see. Karel continues to push me on the bike and in return I get the reply "great job, babe" as I smile every-so kindly to thank him for the suffering. But on the flip side, Karel has really worked hard on his swimming and I can't believe he just started swimming 1 year ago!! I have really enjoyed helping Karel learn to swim and to be there to witness his major swimming breakthroughs. Karel started very slow, working on form for he knew he had a year to train for the IM and there was no need to rush speed when form is the most important part of swimming efficiently. 

The issue for many triathletes who struggle with swimming is the exhaustion that comes from swimming. No matter how fast or slow in the water, how long or short, it is just exhausting and it's not the same kind of exhaustion that you get from pushing yourself during a run or bike set. Although swimming is non weight bearing, one would think it would require less energy to perform. However, any form of exercise increases your breathing rate and as you know, when you swim you do not have a lot of opportunities to breath (or to take in a full inhale and exhale). Seeing that swimming (like any exercise) increases your heart rate and your blood circulation in response to your effort/intensity, your lung capacity, the efficiency in which you take in oxygen and transfer it to blood vessels as well as your form/strength in the water to push past the water's resistance, determine how fast and how far you can swim.

Overtime, your respiratory system will get stronger and you will find your lungs working more efficiently to help you with exchange of gases (oxygen/carbon dioxide). Thus, before you get focused on being fast in the water, it is very important to work on your stroke and swimming effortlessly (as possible) so that you can train the body to perform with the least amount of energy expenditure. The speed will come, just be patient. 

I have been giving Karel swim sets for the past few months and they are really paying off. It is amazing that he is so strong in the water although he does get tired which is to be expected. But, he refuses to give up so he is in the pool 3 times a week working on his form and just being as comfortable as possible in the water. 

On Tuesday before our brick run (immediately after swim) we had a great swim set focusing on a little speed and then pacing. I am trying to help Karel learn how to tolerate lactic acid in the water but not exhausting him (which is what happened a few months ago when Karel would just do fast swims and we figured he wasn't doing any good with consistency for he was just exhausting himself for upcoming workouts). 

Here's the set we did: 
3000 yards

500 warm-up
Main set 3x's: 
3 x 100's fast w/ 15 sec rest (I did them on 1:30, Karel did them on 1:45)
300 steady IM pace (ideally, going the same pace as your cycle, about 15-20 seconds or so per 100 slower than your "fast" pace). 
50 EZ recovery before repeating (or rest 2-3 minutes)

500 pull stretching things out (w/ buoy/paddles)
100 cool down


On Wednesday I had the opportunity to do a podcast with Real Women on Health and Iron Girl and it was a lot of fun as I got to talk about my favorite topics......nutrition, fitness and health! Here is the 30 minute podcast for your listening pleasure if you want to hear my thoughts on eating for fuel, health and pleasure.




I made the most delicious creation the other night and I am so excited to share it with you. I visited wholefoods the other day to explore some new foods to add to our diet and I picked up tri-colored quinoa. Prepared the same as regular quinoa with a nice nutty taste. Speaking of nutty, Karel and I just love tempeh for its taste but it is also packed with protein. It can taste a little bland so I recommend cooking it in a little olive oil (cubed) or you can try to find flavored tempeh (just watch the added sodium). 

Enjoy!

Tri-colored quinoa stir fry
Asparagus
Sweet Peppers
Garlic
Mushrooms
Tempeh

1. In cooking pot, prepare quinoa 
2. In large skillet, turn to medium heat and add a little olive oil (~1-2 tsp per 3 ounces tempeh per person) and cook cubed tempeh until golden brown (toss occasionally). Season with a pinch of salt, turmeric and oregano (pepper optional). 
3. While tempeh is cooking, prepare asparagus by chopping off ends (1 inch) and microwave in shallow dish for 3 minutes until tender (maybe 4 minutes if needed). Then chop. 
4. When tempeh begins to turn golden, add ~1-2 tsp olive oil and add pepper and mushrooms. Toss and reduce heat to low and cover (may need to add a little cooking spray to prevent sticking) and toss occasionally. Let cook for 5-8 minutes or until soft but not browned. 
5. Add asparagus to pan, toss and cook for 1-2 more minutes and then turn off heat. 
6. Assemble plate with ~1/2 cup quinoa + veggie and tempeh mixture. Enjoy!

MY PODCAST IS TOMORROW! Let's talk nutrition, fitness, health, training....

Marni Sumbal


How can exercise and nutrition help improve your strength, increase your energy levels, improve your health and help you meet your fitness goals? 
Whether you're a runner, swimmer, biker or a fitness enthusiast who is new to exercise, it's time to join me for an Iron Girl event, welcoming women from all fitness levels. The only requirement is that you are passionate about living an active and healthy lifestyle.
Learn how to start living a more balanced lifestyle where food tastes good, fad diets don't exist and crossing finish lines is the reward of healthy living choices.

Strong is now the New Skinny! Let's learn how to be healthy in our active lifestyle.

Marni Sumbal, owner of Trimarni Coaching and Nutrition, LLC  will talk to us about her perspective on the importance of developing a healthy relationship with food and your body in order to reach personal health, fitness and body composition goals. 
Join Kelley Connors, MPH, Host, Real Women on Health, with Marni Sumbal, MS, RD, LD/N and find out how you can join the movement to Get Strong with Iron Girl!


I am so excited for tomorrow! Please join me in a new podcast from the RealWomen on Health! and Iron Girl on June 26 at 12:30 p.m. EST. I will explore the theme "Strong is the New Skinny" with my tips on living a balanced, healthy and active lifestyle all while having a healthy relationship with food and the body.

Learn more  HERE and I hope you enjoy the show!


Also - I am so excited that our new item for the Trimarni shop has arrived!! JERSEY's!!
Many people pre-ordered black/white cycling jerseys and cycling shorts (which shipped yesterday!) but we now have a small inventory available of tri/run tops and bottoms (top pictures) as well as a few Jersey's and cycling bottoms which will be available soon on my website. Stay tuned via my FACEBOOK PAGE for more details. Thanks for your support!


Food trend - plant strong athlete

Marni Sumbal


If you are like most individuals, you are not surprised by the number of new, trendy, hip or cool foods on the market. From fresh to processed, our culture loves to eat trendy foods, companies love to profit it off of them and the media loves to talk about them. (perhaps I have reversed this timeline as the media has a major influence on how, what and why we eat). 

Coconut, kale, gluten-free, greek yogurt, juicing, quinoa. Just a few that come to mind when you think of the recent foods that are most talked about when discussing "healthy eating" or dieting. Anyone remember Olestra?

Did you know that there are over a dozen types of lettuces? I wrote a blog a while back on the many types of green leafy options that you can add to your current diet. 

How come the media isn't obsessing about Mâche, Mesclun or Mizuna and how come the grocery stores aren't carrying them for us to enjoy? 

When I work with individuals on the diet, specifically for performance or health purposes, it is very important to me that I treat each athlete/fitness enthusiast as an individual. But in our quick-fix society, it is so easy to want to be like the masses - do like others to receive the same results. 

In the past 20 years, I have "worked" on my diet to create a diet that gives me food freedom and peace with food. Comfort with my food choices without obsessing about calories or portions or food preparation. I have worked on mindful eating the most in that keeps me constantly in the moment when it comes to eating. I know how it feels to overeat and it doesn't feel good. So I don't do it. I don't get cravings or drops in blood sugar because I have tweaked my diet in a way that prevents these issues from happening. It may not work for others how I eat but my body is happy and my body is healthy. Why should I try to  follow a food trend or diet if I have created my own diet that allows me to function well in this world (and performance to the best of my ability during training/racing)? 

 At age 10-11, I decided to not eat meat for animal reasons and since then, I have learned how to eat as a healthy and active athlete/health conscious individual. I call myself a vegetarian because I don't and will never eat meat. It isn't a fad or a temporary trend. 

I know how to maintain my diet when traveling, eating on the road, eating at events and eating at home. I am always excited to better myself with my food choices, especially when it comes to bettering my health and performance but I am not "trying" new ways of eating as if I need to fix what is not broken. I have never fasted, cleansed or detoxed for my body never gets out of whack. 

I see nothing wrong with trying new things and tweaking the diet. Some styles of eating that are trendy (Ex. Mediterranean, vegetarian) actually come with a host of health benefits but that doesn't mean that you have to follow them strictly to still receive health benefits. That is how I work with others for I believe that learning how to create a healthy relationship with food is best mastered when you recognize what foods make YOU feel the best and enhance your lifestyle. Although adding kale and greek yogurt to your diet will not override other dietary choices, certainly there are many great foods out there that without the media, perhaps we would have never seen in the grocery store or recognized at farmers markets. 

When you think about the food trends in 2012, I am sure you have tried those foods or have adopted a diet that includes those foods (some or all). Nothing wrong with that as I hope that you are still working on your diet to support your individual needs and goals and not eating something temporary or for a quick-fix because the news, a celebrity, coach or nutrition guru told you that if you eat this, you will be "healthy". 

As I mentioned above, my plant-strong diet is with me for the rest of my life. It is not something that I will deviate from but instead, enjoy it as it helps me live an active lifestyle. But in the past 20 years, I have worked at it and I invite you to do the same for your own diet. 

Elimination diets are very trendy and I am not a fan. I feel that spending your energy on what not to eat is only going to set you up for failure and restriction in the diet and lack of flexibility with eating (especially around others). Banning food is not the way to go if you want to "be healthy" so instead, I invite you to think about what you aren't eating, possibly what you could be eating instead, as a way to create a positive relationship with food and perhaps, stop blaming the outcome or effect and instead, direct your positive energy to the missing link(s). 


I love writing about plant strong eating because not only do I practice what I preach in consuming a plant-strong diet for health and performance benefits but also, because we all need to do a great job, every day, of making sure we nourish our bodies with real food, mostly plants. If you feel you have "bad" food in the diet, perhaps you just don't have room for other foods (or not making room or the time to consume them) and it is within those other foods that you can make a positive impact on your health, mood, body and performance. It isn't as if one food is better than the other and certainly, no food is "bad" when consumed on occasional eats/treats but take some time - a few weeks at the minimum, to give a little thought to your diet to make sure that you are not "working" on your diet to be like others or to "fit-in" but instead, create a diet that works for you and is here to stay.

Is Plant-Strong "Healthy" for an Athlete? By Marni Sumbal

Healthy eating can be confusing when it's aimed to the masses. With many research-supported guidelines for "healthy" eating, a plant-strong diet is often celebrated as the most effective way to reduce risk for disease and manage a healthy weight. Although it is not required that you give yourself a dietary title as to what you don't eat, consider a variety of health promoting plant-strong foods to fuel and nourish your active lifestyle.

Protein is essential to assist in growth and repair of muscles, bones and tissues, keeps hair, skin and nails in good health, is helpful for the immune system and helps to keep the metabolism, digestion and brain in optimal health.

For most athletes, meeting recommendations for protein (1-1.5 g/kg/d) can easily be accomplished through a varied diet. To ensure a decrease in fat mass (and not lean muscle mass) if striving for weight loss/body composition changes, do not neglect quality, portioned controlled protein at meals, snacks and for workout recovery. 

For proper digestion and absorption, satiety and control of blood sugar with carbohydrates, all individuals should aim for around 20-30g of protein per meal and addition protein with workout recovery/daily snacks to meet your individual daily recommend protein intake.

Nutrition plays a major role in your training regime and the choice for a specific dietary regime (or any variation) should not sabotage your training plan. Because you can't out-train a poorly planned diet, your diet should keep you healthy, active and happy. If your eating today is restrictive based on how you ate yesterday, ditch the diet plan mentality. 

Maintain a healthy relationship with food and consider a more plant strong, balanced diet as you enjoy the creativity, freedom and flexibility that come with eating a variety of whole foods.

Meat or no meat, choose foods that are simple to prepare, convenient, safe, wholesome and pleasurable as you support your healthy lifestyle with consistent fitness/performance gains.

Here's a protein-rich, plant strong meal which has an extra bonus:  many valuable vitamins and minerals within this meal aside from protein!

1 cup mushrooms - 2 protein
2 cups cooked broccoli - 8g protein
1/2 cup farro - 4g protein
1/4 cup black beans - 3.5 g protein
3 ounce tofu - 7g protein
1 cup cherry tomatoes - 1g protein
1/2 cup peas - 3.5g protein
1/2 ounce pumpkin seeds - 2.5g protein
Total: 31.5g protein


Read more: Iron Girl

Is your body ready for a running race?

Marni Sumbal

  

Running is a gift. Despite growing up as a swimmer (loving water activities more than on land), I really enjoyed the freedom that running gave me when I started and perhaps that is why I have grown into a triathlete. 

But it is true that running is a gift and it isn't for everyone. Some don't enjoy it, some can't do it. For myself, running has been taken away from me many times since I started running and that is why I feel that I am more of a triathlete, than a runner. I love to run, but I rather do it after a swim and a bike. I was born with a body that was not designed to be a "runner" and I'm cool with that. It's not about finishing times, but the lifestyle. I like to be active and triathlon's give me challenges and happiness and I never take a workout for granted. 


I am so excited to announce that the first race of the 2013 Athleta Iron Girl event series is on April 14th!
I won't be attending this year but I suppose nothing can top last year as it was my first time winning a running race (with my triathlete body)  and what better than at my favorite all-women's racing series!

I absolutely loved writing my race report - appropriately titled "The race report I never imagined I would get to write.".

Knowing that running is a lot of fun when you are healthy, I guess I have a different outlook on run-training in terms of not taking any "workout" for granted. To help out those of you who are interested in running/walking in a running race, wanting to step up your running training or struggle with injuries/overtraining/burnout, I hope you enjoy my latest article from my monthly Iron Girl column.

Happy Running!


Is Your Body Ready for a Running Race? By Marni Sumbal
Running can great for the body and mind. However, a weak, poorly nourished, sick or injured body can leave you questioning your ability to get to a running starting line. In contrast, a well-trained, fueled and motivated body is an amazing piece of work, designed to reach goals and to live a healthy, quality life. Here are a few suggestions to make for a fun and active running season.
Quality training – have a plan
A training plan will not only improve your fitness but will keep you on a schedule that focuses on quality training, thus eliminating the junk miles (which leading to injuries, burn-out and overtraining).

Build slowly
Allow ~4 weeks to gradually adapt to running. Focus on running drills, cross training (ex. elliptical, swimming, cycling, yoga, anti-gravity treadmill) and functional strength training. Don’t forget to stretch your hip flexors regularly and warm-up before starting your workouts
.


Extra tips
- Don’t hesitate to include a walk/run strategy into your training/racing strategy to reduce residual fatigue and to enhance recovery.
-Avoid being strict on miles, time, heart rate or pace. Perceived exertion can be a helpful training “tool”.
-Even if you desire a change in body composition, do not fear sport nutrition to assist in quality training, before, during and after activity.
-Invest in quality training/recovery tools, such as a GPS-enabled heart rate device, massages and compression gear.
-Can you comfortably run (or run/walk) 45 minutes? Consider adding a mix of intervals (ex. track), tempo workouts (maximal sustainable pace) and long runs (group runs are encouraged) to boost aerobic and anaerobic fitness.
-Don’t rush the “intro” phase to help prepare the mind and body for the upcoming training plan. Also, don’t overlook the importance of rest and active recovery.
-Give yourself at least 3 months of periodized (base, build, peak, taper) training to prepare for your upcoming race. The more time you have to gradually progress with training, the fitter, faster, healthier and stronger you will be on race day.
- It is easy to overlook your current health status when you have ambitious and exciting fitness goals. Be sure to consult with your physician prior to starting a new physical challenge.
-The ultimate goal is to train consistently well, with a trained body and to have the mind as the only limiter on race day. Good luck and have fun!!


Marni Sumbal, MS, RD, LD/N

Marni works as a Clinical Dietitian at Baptist Medical Center Beaches, is the owner of Trimarni Coaching and Nutrition, LLC and provides one-on-one consulting in the Jacksonville, FL area. Marni is a Registered Dietitian, holding a Master of Science in Exercise Physiology and is a Certified Sports Nutritionist (CISSN). As an elite endurance athlete, she is also a Level-1 USAT Coach and a 5x Ironman finisher. Marni is a 110% play harder, Hammer Nutrition, Brooks ID running and Oakley Women brand ambassador. Marni enjoys public speaking and writing, and she has several published articles in Fitness Magazine, Women's Running, Men's Journal, Bicycling Magazine, The Florida Times-Union Shorelines, Lava Magazine, Hammer Endurance News, CosmoGirl magazine and Triathlete Magazine, and contributes to IronGirl.com, USAT multisport zone and Lava online.

Email trimarnicoaching@gmail.com
Blog: trimarniblogspot.com
Website: trimarnicoach.com






Fall into Seasonal Nutrition

Marni Sumbal

Source

 
I may live in Florida but I LOVE the change of seasons throughout the year. Although we (Floridians) may not rake the leaves or shovel the snow, the hot humid temps will eventually go away and the cooler temps will grace our bodies as we bundle up for "winter" bike rides and runs.
 
Just like I love the change in temps (which reminds me that it is officially my off-season), I also love the change of produce. Enjoying seasonal produce keeps my creativity going throughout the year to avoid eating/cooking-boredom and I always look forward to the dark colors in my meals and robust flavors that fill my house. My crock pot, oven and panini maker get a lot of action in the fall/winter but before I know it, it'll be spring again.
 
My latest article from my Iron Girl column comes at a perfect time. With my best triathlon season ever ending on a high note, the next 3-4 weeks of unstructured activity allow for lots of (extra) time in my kitchen. Although we all need some downtime from structured training (for both body and mind), we must never forget the importance of nourishing the body with wholesome food.
 
I hope you enjoy my latest article.....happy cooking!
 
Fall into Seasonal Nutrition
-Marni Sumbal MS, RD, LD/N
From: Irongirl.com
Fall is around the corner but not to rush it, the Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte is already in season. At 370 calories and 49g sugar (12 tsp sugar), make the Grande, 16-ounce Pumpkin Spice Latte from Starbucks an occasional indulgence and save money (and time) by making your own.

Combine ½ tsp cinnamon, ¼ tsp ground ginger, 1/8 tsp ground allspice (or cloves) and 1/8 tsp ground nutmeg to make 1 tsp pumpkin spice. Sprinkle a little of this mixture on coffee grinds before brewing and instantly, comforting pumpkin spice coffee to sooth your system on a cool fall morning.
From the smells of the crockpot filling your house to spiced ginger tea after a chilly morning run, the bold flavors and strong scents of the fall are not to be ignored. What more could you ask for when it comes to fall nutrition?
A few of my fall favorites

1) String Beans - an excellent source of vitamin C to keep the sickness away, as well as a good source of vitamin A and folate. Beans should be bright in color and should snap easily when you bend them. Use within 5 days of purchasing, stored in the refrigerator. For easy cooking, boil ½ lb beans in 1.5 quarts water for 10-12 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. When ready, stir in a little sunflower oil until golden brown and after cooking, toss in a little feta and sundried tomatoes for a sweet, salty side dish.
2) Broccoli Rabe - a good source of vitamin C and iron to keep you energized throughout the day. Choose bright, crisp and tender leaves with beautiful broccoli-like florets. To maintain moisture, wrap unwashed greens in paper towel and place inside a plastic bag (or vegetable fresh bag). Keep refrigerated for up to 3 days and rinse before using. For a satisfying dish, combine with whole wheat orzo or quinoa and season with oregano and crushed garlic.
3) Celery root - an excellent source of vitamin C and to keep your body strong, a good source of calcium and iron. Celery root should be smaller than a softball, without bruised skin. Keep in a cool, dry place for up to a week. When ready, wash and peel before using. Add celery root to your favorite vegetarian stew or try it raw in your best potato salad recipe.
4) Winter squash - an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium and fiber and a good source of folate and thiamine. Squash should feel heavy and skin should be without bruises. Keep for a few weeks, in a cool, dry place. Slice squash in half and remove seeds. Sprinkle with a dash of sea salt and drizzle w/ olive oil. Roast for 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes, until lightly golden on top and tender inside. Add to Add cooked or chilled to any stir fry, pilaf or salad.
5) Apples - an excellent source of fiber to help control blood sugar and to ensure a healthy digestive system and a good source of vitamin C. Apples should be firm without blemishes. Store at room temperature for up to 7 days or for a few weeks in the refrigerator. Raw apples make for a great afternoon snack (especially with nut butter) or toss in a recovery smoothie or oatmeal for a dessert-like, filling meal.

To reduce inflammation and improve overall health, consider adding anti-oxidant-rich herbs and spices to your current diet:
-Cloves
-Oregano
-Ginger
-Turmeric
-Basil
-Marjoram
-Mustard
-Cinnamon
-Curry
-Paprika
-Chili
-Rosemary
-All spice
-Thyme
-Sage
-Saffron
More information about fall fruits and veggies can be found here: http://www.foodfit.com/healthy/healthyfallfoods.asp
Marni Sumbal, MS, RD, LD/N

Marni works as a Clinical Dietitian at Baptist Medical Center Beaches, is the owner of Trimarni Coaching and Nutrition, LLC and provides one-on-one consulting in the Jacksonville, FL area. Marni is a Registered Dietitian, holding a Master of Science in Exercise Physiology and is a Certified Sports Nutritionist (CISSN). As an elite endurance athlete, she is also a Level-1 USAT Coach and a 5x Ironman finisher. Marni is a 110% play harder, Hammer Nutrition and Oakley Women brand ambassador. Marni enjoys public speaking and writing, and she has several published articles in Runner's World Magazine, Fitness Magazine, Bicycling Magazine, The Florida Times-Union Shorelines, Lava Magazine, Hammer Endurance News, CosmoGirl magazine and Triathlete Magazine, and contributes to IronGirl.com, USAT multisport zone and Lava online.